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NU-D.A.Y.

Northeastern United for Drugs Affected Youth

The NU-D.A.Y division offers three valuable programs.

Eligibility Criteria: To be eligible to participate in the APG, a youth must be between the ages of 13-17, diagnosed with a substance use disorder (mild, moderate, or severe), and reside in the Northeastern NJ Region.

*** Priority will be given to youth who are involved with the justice system***

Services Offered: APG services will run for 2.5 hours three evenings per week. Weekend activities will also be offered on a rotating schedule.

*** Upon completion youth will be encouraged to continue to attend weekly self-help groups and social/recreational activities***

Program Length: Minimum of 10 weeks

*** Service period may be extended***

Brief overview of APG model: The basic components of an APG are as follows:

  • Mentorship: Young adult role models in recovery who have received specialized training in how to mentor youth with substance use disorders.
  • Counseling: Less central in an APG than in a traditional outpatient model, counseling is provided by a licensed mental health professional who specializes in adolescent SUD issues.
  • Psychosocial Education: Non-clinical in nature, psychosocial education groups cover topics spanning the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Eight Dimensions of Wellness
  • Family Support: A once-weekly family support group will be offered for parents, guardians, and other family members
  • Self-Help Meetings: Self-help meetings will be offered twice weekly at the APG and facilitated by a mentor or by a youth leader.
  • Social Functions: Weekly social functions may include open mic night, poetry slams, sporting events, hikes, beach days, and more.

This program is grant-funded and there is no cost to participate.

Funded by:

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Preveention Logo

APG DIagram

Grant#2020-YB-FX-0008

Eligibility Criteria: Families impacted by a parent or caretaker’s substance use and opioid use disorder (OUD).

Services Offered: The 16-week curriculum will be offered three times per year, with one round being offered in Spanish.

Program Length: 16-week Curriculum

Brief overview of Celebrating Families! Model: Session topics include:

  • Orientation and getting started
  • Healthy living
  • Nutrition
  • Communication
  • Feelings and defenses
  • Anger management
  • Facts about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs
  • Chemical dependency as a disease
  • Effect of chemical dependency on the whole family
  • Goal setting
  • Making healthy choices
  • Healthy boundaries
  • Healthy friendships and relationships
  • How We Learn
  • Our Uniqueness
  • Celebration!

This program is grant-funded and there is no cost to participate.

Funded by:

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Preveention Logo

Celebrating Family Logo

Grant#2020-YB-FX-0008

Eligibility Criteria: Desire to attend free workshops and training to assist our youth, families, and communities with substance use disorders.

Services Offered: Training and workshops to encourage the proliferation of the SBIRT model for adolescents, APG model, CRAFT model, and Celebrating Families model NU-D.A.Y. will provide training to professionals, including pediatricians, school nurses and guidance counselors, law enforcement, prosecutors, parole, probation and other professionals who regularly come into contact with youth.

SBIRT is comprised of the following steps:

  • Screening: A healthcare professional uses a validated screening tool to assess for risky substance use behaviors. This can be done across a variety of settings, including primary care and school-based settings. If the individual screens low, the healthcare provider provides positive reinforcement for healthy choices and does not move on to the next step.
  • Brief Intervention: A healthcare professional engages a patient who has screened as moderate to high risk in a conversation about risky substance use behaviors in a short conversation, providing feedback and advice. Depending on the score and outcome of the conversation, the healthcare professional may move on to step three.
  • Referral to Treatment: A healthcare professional refers the individual for a more thorough substance use assessment to determine the appropriate level of care to address an existing substance use issue if indicated.

The basic components of an APG are as follows:

  • Mentorship: Young adult role models in recovery who have received specialized training in how to mentor youth with substance use disorders.
  • Counseling: Less central in an APG than in a traditional outpatient model, counseling is provided by a licensed mental health professional who specializes in adolescent SUD issues.
  • Psychosocial Education: Non-clinical in nature, psychosocial education groups cover topics spanning the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Eight Dimensions of Wellness
  • Family Support: A once-weekly family support group will be offered for parents, guardians, and other family members
  • Self-Help Meetings: Self-help meetings will be offered twice weekly at the APG and facilitated by a mentor or by a youth leader.
  • Social Functions: Weekly social functions may include open mic night, poetry slams, sporting events, hikes, beach days, and more.

Celebrating Families! Model Session topics include:

  • Orientation and getting started
  • Healthy living
  • Nutrition
  • Communication
  • Feelings and defenses
  • Anger management
  • Facts about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs
  • Chemical dependency as a disease
  • Effect of chemical dependency on the whole family
  • Goal setting
  • Making healthy choices
  • Healthy boundaries
  • Healthy friendships and relationships
  • How We Learn
  • Our Uniqueness
  • Celebration!

CRAFT teaches several skills, including:

  • Understanding a loved one’s triggers to use substances
  • Positive communication strategies
  • Positive reinforcement strategies – rewarding non-using behavior
  • Problem-solving
  • Self-care
  • Domestic violence precautions
  • Getting a loved one to accept help

This program is grant-funded and there is no cost to participate.

Funded by:

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Preveention Logo

Celebrating Families Logo

APG Diagram

Craft Logo - Community Reinforcement and Family Training
Grant#2020-YB-FX-0008

Dameon Marquese Stackhouse,
MSW, LSW, CPRS, LCSW INTERN, LCADC INTERN

Dameon Marquese Stackhouse
Title: Program Supervisor
Office Phone: (732) 381-4100 ex.106
Cell Phone: (732) 768-8516
Email: dstackhouse@preventionlinks.org
Languages: English

Dameon is the Program Supervisor for NU-D.A.Y. at Prevention Links where he works with youth dealing with Substance Use Disorders and their families. Dameon obtained his Bachelor’s and Master’s in Social Work at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. He is a Youth Advocate that believes that when we change the trajectory of our kids’ lives, it changes the trajectory of the community’s life. Dameon loves playing chess and watching Jeopardy. He also enjoys listening to music but one of his favorite genres is classical. Dameon is an Activist for SOCIAL JUSTICE.

Contact Info

NU-D.A.Y.
121-125 Chestnut Street Suite 301,
3rd Floor Roselle, New Jersey 07203
phone: 732-768-8516
dstackhouse@preventionlinks.org

Prevention Links
121-125 Chestnut Street Suite 301,
3rd Floor Roselle, New Jersey 07203
phone: 732-381-4100
TTY: 732.381.4192
Fax: 732.381.0140
info@preventionlinks.org

Contact NU-D.A.Y.